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 NYS. License Home Inspector
  John Graham #16000005054

 
Building Codes

Before issuing the building permit, the building department usually verifies that the plans conform to all applicable codes and regulations, including applicable building codes. Before commencing construction on a new building or altering an existing building, you must first secure a building permit. You apply for a building permit at the local building department. Before issuing the building permit, the building department usually verifies that the plans conform to all applicable codes and regulations, including applicable building codes. The building department will also check if the plans meeting zoning and other codes. A building inspector from the local building department will periodically check the site as construction progresses. When the construction is completed, the building inspector will make a final inspection. If the construction passes the final inspection, the building department will issue a Certificate of Occupancy.

A building inspector from the local building department will periodically check the site as construction progresses. The State of New York and City of New York have their own building codes. However, many many areas of the country use standardized codes. For more information, visit the International Conference of Building Code Officials web site, the Building Officials and Code Administrators (BOCA) web site, or the International Code Council web site.

Building Permit

An application for a building permit is filed with the local building department. If you are constructing a new building or making changes to your home or building, you are probably required to obtain a building permit. An application for a building permit is filed with the local building department. This application may require plans be filed, site studies be conducted, etc. The building department either issues a building permit, recommends changes to the plan that will allow a building permit to be issued, or denies the permit application. You may appeal the building department’s decision. No work may begin until the building department issues the building permit.

You need to obtain a building permit for new construction or altering existing construction. You generally do not have to obtain a building permit to make repairs, although there are exceptions to this rule. Additions, finishing an attic or basement, or changing interior walls are examples of alterations that require a building permit. A wood-burning stove or an indoor hot tub may also require a building permit. In addition exterior additions such as a deck, pool, fence, shed, or garage may require a building permit. The following type of work often needs a building permit:

* New construction.
* Alteration of an existing building.
* An addition to an existing building.
* Change in use of a building.
* Cutting of part or all of a wall or partition.
* Removal or cutting of any structural beam or bearing support.
* Removal or change of any required means of egress.
* Work affecting structural or fire safety.
* Work that increases the nonconformity of an existing building.
* Work that affects public health or safety.

You should contact the local building department to see if a building permit is required for your planned construction or alteration.

Building Department

The local building department performs many functions. Some of the functions include:

* Building permit application and plan review.
* Issuing building permits for approved plans.
* Providing information to contractors, Licensed Professional Engineers, Registered Architects, and the general public on applicable building codes and other regulations.
* Providing advice to other municipal agencies regarding building codes and other applicable regulations.
* Dispatching the building inspector to review construction at the appropriate times.
* Reviewing changes proposed during construction.
* Performing the final inspection when construction is completed.
* Issuing a Certificate of Occupancy when all construction requirements have been met.
* Maintaining records on all construction within the municipality.
* Enforcing regulations and issuing violations when appropriate.


A wood-burning stove or an indoor hot tub may also require a building permit. In addition exterior additions such as a deck, pool, fence, shed, or garage may require a building permit. The building code sets the minimum construction standards for a house or building. Because of the way that building codes have evolved over the years, the minimum building code standards are usually sufficient. Exceeding the minimum building code requirements does not necessarily give you a better building. Often, exceeding the requirements will just increase construction costs and delay construction.

Building Inspector

The building inspector performs many functions as part of the building department:

* Examines building permit applications for the building department.
* As a member of the building department, advises Licensed Professional Engineers, Registered Architects, other municipal agencies, and the general public on applicable building codes and other regulations.
* Conducts inspections during a construction project.
* Issues violations, if necessary. These violations may result in a court appearance if not rectified.
* Issues a Certificate of Occupancy after a construction project is completed and meets all applicable building codes and other requirements.



Certificate of Occupancy

When all the requirements of the building code have been met, and all other local municipal requirements have been met, a Certificate of Occupancy will be issued. When all the requirements of the building code have been met, and all other local municipal requirements have been met, a Certificate of Occupancy will be issued. The Certificate of Occupancy generally means that the building complies with all codes and regulations applicable at the time of construction.

Prior to issuing the Certificate of Occupancy, a building inspector has probably checked the construction project several times during the project. Even so, the Certificate of Occupancy is not a guarantee from the building department that the building is perfect. The inspection is limited to areas that could be checked during the building inspector’s inspection. However, the Certificate of Occupancy gives you some assurance that the building complied with applicable codes and regulations at the time of construction.

Many banks and lending institutions require an up-to-date Certificate of Occupancy before they will issue a mortgage. In some cases a Certificate of Occupancy cannot be issued because no building permit was issued prior to construction, and the building inspector was not called in during construction. In these cases, the building department may issue a Certificate of Alteration, Certificate of Compliance, or Certificate of Completion. A similar document may be issued for outside items like decks and pools, or inside items like a wood burning stove. Consult your local building department for more information if you are looking at a building that has been altered.

Building Code Specifics

The State of New York has its own building code. Buildings within the City of New York meet the City of New York building codes.  The State of New York has its own building code. This building code applies throughout most of New York State. Federal buildings may be exempt from the state building code. Federal buildings have to meet federal standards, and are generally exempt from local codes. Buildings within the City of New York meet the City of New York building codes.

New Jersey and Connecticut use a building code based on the BOCA national code. Many other states base their building codes on the BOCA codes. Both states modify the codes as appropriate.

In addition, all building codes refer to numerous reference standards. These reference standards can cover anything from gas equipment installation to obscure topics like required ventilation in a fish processing plant. The reference standards include many thousands of pages that far exceed the expertise of any individual.

Local municipalities may amend the state building codes. Generally, requirements are added to the codes in response to local concerns. Rarely is a local municipality permitted to delete a requirement from the state building code.

Finally, numerous other codes and regulations may be applicable. Zoning codes and housing codes affect how and where buildings are constructed. The local planning department may reject a proposal that meets all other applicable codes. Sites must meet wetland and environmental regulations. Depending on the type of building, other regulations such as health department and general business laws may apply.

If you have a question regarding the building code, you can start by asking the local building department. In many cases, the issues are complex and require the services of a Licensed Professional Engineer or a Registered Architect.

Fire Prevention

Many of the building code sections were written in response to injuries or deaths that occurred during a fire or other catastrophic event. Contrary to popular belief, the building codes are not an instruction manual of how to build a building. Little is said in the building code on issues such as what size or type of nails should be used, required wood sizes, etc. A lot is said about issues such as required fire rating, required exits, exit lighting, etc. Modern building codes often have titles such as Uniform State Fire Prevention and Building Code.

Many of the building code sections were written in response to injuries or deaths that occurred during a fire or other catastrophic event. Other sections of the building codes deal with life safety issues, hazardous conditions, required ventilation, lighting, etc. For more information on fire protection and life safety, visit the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA™) web site.

If one were to use the building code as a manual of how to build, the resulting building would have many problems. While the building code is essential information to anyone building a home, It should be viewed as a reference document and not a how-to book.

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(call 7 days a week from 8am to 9pm)
Call 631-243-6642
516-942-0009
Cell Phone Call or Text @ 631-834-5448
Have me call you.


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